Archive for September, 2011

How to Be Angry Featured on Parenting Unplugged

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I had the lovely, lively opportunity to chat with Todd and Laura Mansfield, hosts of Parenting Unplugged, about How To Be Angry and ways parents can teach their kids skills for managing intense emotions.  Have 20 minutes?  Have a listen…

http://www.parentingunpluggedradio.com/2011/09/28/3-ways-to-help-your-children-stay-safe-while-being-angry/

 

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Training on How to Manage Passive Aggressive Behavior

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This November 18th, the New Hampshire Center for Effective Behavioral Interventions and Supports (NH CEBIS) will host a one-day training on The Angry Smile (see Workshops & Speaking Page for full details).

Do you live or work with someone who:

  • Denies or represses feelings of anger
  •  Withdraws and sulks
  • Sends hidden, coded and confusing messages when frustrated
  • Procrastinates or carries out tasks inefficiently
  • Is quietly manipulative and controlling
  • Makes endless promises to change
  • Creates a feeling in others of being on an emotional roller coater

This workshop takes an in-depth look at the roots of passive aggression, exploring the behavior at five distinct and (more…)

Dealing with Rumors, Gossip, and Reputations

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Check out this great article by Rachel Simmons, as featured in Teen Vogue: http://www.teenvogue.com/connect/2011/09/reputation-rehab?currentPage=1  Simmons shares real life stories of ruined reputations and how girls can cope with social ostracism.

The article is jam-packed with pearls of wisdom, but this quote from one of the gossip-survivors just rings especially true:

Elsa realized that denying the rumors seemed to make them worse, so she decided  to confront them head-on. “The more I was like, ‘It happened. Get over it,’ the  more people would drop it. I think that when you don’t tell people things and  they know it, they become even more invested in figuring out what it is. If  you’re honest and up-front about it, it goes away.”

Read More http://www.teenvogue.com/connect/2011/09/reputation-rehab#ixzz1Z9uExJkF

There Goes Mom of the Year…Again

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Parenting blunders are so much more readable than parenting advice, don’tcha think?  Check out mine…

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/signe-whitson/shopping-kids-grocery_b_976293.html

If you can relate to falling out of the running for Parent of the Year…repeatedly…please share this link with your fellow Moms-in-need-of-a-do-over.

 

I Can Not Tell a Lie: When Role Modeling Backfires…

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When your parents accuse you of lying to them…

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You Don't Really Feel That Way, Part 2

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A few weeks ago, I posted an article by a great professional, Blogger, and founder of Kidlutions, Wendy Young.  The article was called “You Don’t Really Feel That Way, Part 1.”  

Here, Wendy posts Part 2, a follow-up piece that talks about how to validate kids’ emotional experiences and drain off their intense emotions effectively.  I love what she has to say and how well she explains the approach.  “Drain Off” is my term, not Wendy’s.  Actually, it is a Life Space Crisis Intervention term, and marks the first stage of LSCI’s six stage process of helping kids with self-defeating behaviors develop insight into their patterns and improved relationships with helping adults.

I have followed Wendy’s blogs and articles for about a year now and find myself on the same page with her time after time.  This is no exception.  I hope you’ll check out her work and, if you like it, be sure to also check out www.lsci.org, since our training coincides so well with the kinds of thigs she is writing.

http://kidlutions.blogspot.com/2011/09/you-really-dont-feel-that-waypart-ii.html#comment-form

 

You Don’t Really Feel That Way, Part 2

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A few weeks ago, I posted an article by a great professional, Blogger, and founder of Kidlutions, Wendy Young.  The article was called “You Don’t Really Feel That Way, Part 1.”  

Here, Wendy posts Part 2, a follow-up piece that talks about how to validate kids’ emotional experiences and drain off their intense emotions effectively.  I love what she has to say and how well she explains the approach.  “Drain Off” is my term, not Wendy’s.  Actually, it is a Life Space Crisis Intervention term, and marks the first stage of LSCI’s six stage process of helping kids with self-defeating behaviors develop insight into their patterns and improved relationships with helping adults.

I have followed Wendy’s blogs and articles for about a year now and find myself on the same page with her time after time.  This is no exception.  I hope you’ll check out her work and, if you like it, be sure to also check out www.lsci.org, since our training coincides so well with the kinds of thigs she is writing.

http://kidlutions.blogspot.com/2011/09/you-really-dont-feel-that-waypart-ii.html#comment-form

 

Re-thinking the "Drama" Approach to Bullying

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Please check out this is great, thought-provoking op-ed piece from the NY Times.  I whole-heartedly agree that with the authors that:

Interventions must focus on positive concepts like healthy relationships and digital citizenship rather than starting with the negative framing of bullying. The key is to help young people feel independently strong, confident and capable without first requiring them to see themselves as either an oppressed person or an oppressor.

It’s the social worker in me, I suppose; I am a strengths-perspective kinda girl.  In my new book, this is the approach I take.    While the book title Friendship & Other Weapons is used to convey to adult readers the nature of how girl bullying is acted out within relationships, girl participants will come to know their membership as part of a Real Friendships group.  As such, the solution-focused lessons, engaging group activities and relevant discussions will help girls cope with “drama” in honest, relationship-enhancing, self-affirming ways.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/23/opinion/why-cyberbullying-rhetoric-misses-the-mark.html?_r=1&ref=opinion

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