Posts tagged bullying

The Long Term Impact of Bullying: What Parents, Teachers, and All Adults Need to Know

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As an author and educator on bullying, I have a keen sense about the urgency of my message but also a healthy awareness that as people sit down to attend one of my trainings, they may begin as “prisoners.”  In other words, some boss or supervisor somewhere assigned the person to attend, though what they’d really rather be doing is preparing their classroom, working on lesson plans, collaborating with other teachers, or, well, anything but listening to another talking head droning on and on about an educator’s obligation to stop bullying.  Yes, the bullying that was once never talked about has now have become so pervasive (and too often finger-wagging) that us anti-bullying messengers have run the risk of sounding like the teachers in the Charlie Brown cartoons.

My goal is always to turn the prisoners into opportunity-seekers: to help educator’s understand that they are in the rare position to “be that one person” in a child’s life who makes the child feel heard, understood, valued, defended, and strong.  Likewise, teachers can reach out to kids who bully, understand the pain behind their aggressive behavior, and teach those students better way to behave, more constructive ways to exert power and control in their lives. As Haim Ginnot once said, teachers really are THE decisive element in the classroom.

This article, featured online in Science Daily, is a great tool for helping teachers, parents, and all adults understand the long term impact of bullying and realize that stopping bullying is not just one more item on the To Do list, but rather a critical opportunity to make all of the difference in a child’s long term well-being:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130819102708.htm

 

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It is the Adult’s Obligation to Remain Connected to Kids, to Help Stop Bullying

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Great article in Education Week about the moral obligation of educators–and all adults–to remain connected with kids and take decisive action to prioritize the dignity and safety of young people.

“…schools have a responsibility not only to help students learn, but also to keep them safe, physically and emotionally, while they are in our care. If we are not addressing the culture of bullying and public shaming, if we are not doing everything we can to teach young people how to treat each other kindly and civilly, if we are ignoring social and emotional crises unfolding before our eyes, we are failing Rehtaeh and thousands like her.”

 

To read more, please visit: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2013/08/07/37azin.h32.html?tkn=ZMSF27GGZeLPugmJWLy3TPmVIskIUi5%2B7KZS&cmp=ENL-EU-VIEWS1

 

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4 Essential Strategies for Stopping Bullying in Classrooms and Schools

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Classroom teachers have everything to do with stopping bullying. There. I said it. I often hesitate to make this assertion so plainly when speaking to educators, fearing my next move will have to be fending off rotten tomatoes lobbed at my head by teachers who won’t stand for having yet another responsibility heaped onto their already-overflowing plates.

 

If the spoiled fruit ever were to be thrown my way, I would understand the sentiment, but the fact that they never are is a true testament to the tremendous job that most classroom teachers willingly take on every day of the school year. The teachers who are making a difference in the movement to stop bullying are engaged role models of kindness and expert masters of diplomacy. They are true champions of the underdog and astute shapers of peer culture. They are not afraid to be direct and to confront bullying behavior whenever they see it. These teachers are improving the lives of young people each and every day and demonstrating that time spent on bullying prevention is time saved on conflict, alienation, academic struggles, and victimization. What follows are four strategies for stopping bullying that effective teachers share in common:

 

Click here to read my article on the HuffingtonPost that explains four strategies effective teachers use to stop bullying in their classrooms and schools:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/signe-whitson/the-decisive-element-in-t_b_2909367.html

 

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Every Child Has Worth & Value

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New Book Announcement: 8 Keys to End Bullying

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I’m super-excited to share with you the cover of my new book, due out in the Spring of 2014, via Norton Publishers. The best part (aside from hoping to help lots of teachers, counselors, and kids, of course) is no more waking up at 5am to sneak in some quiet writing hours! Cheers to sleeping in for the rest of the Summer!!

 

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Who is Bullying Really All About?

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TheWaywetalktoourchildren

The Way We Talk to Our Children Becomes their Inner Voice

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Words Matter: Check out this terrific anti-bullying campaign and poster!

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No Bullying! News Clip from the Allentown Morning Call

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Well, imagine my surprise when I came across this video clip!  Yes, I do recall talking on camera to a reporter, just prior to beginning a recent Bullying Awareness StoryTime event, but No, I had no clue that it had been produced and published online.  After initial feelings of stage fright-induced nausea…it’s actually a pleasant surprise. 

 

So, friends, introducing ME, introducing my Shredders and Builders Activity (featured in Friendship & Other Weapons) to teach young kids about the power of words and the importance of kindness in friendship.

 

No Bullying!

Check out these National Anti-Bullying Awareness Month Posters by Kids

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On Saturday, I did a book signing at a Barnes & Noble in eastern PA.  Lots of bright, creative kids made my day by creating artwork representing “How to be a friend to someone who is being bullied.” I couldn’t keep them all to myself!  Below, please join me in enjoying a few of my favorite masterpieces. Thanks to ALL of the kids who participated!

By Nina F.


By Aubrey M.


By Elle W.


By Kaylee R.

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