Posts tagged dealing with passive aggressive behavior

How Passive Aggressive Are You?


Currently, I am working on updating The Angry Smile text, for what will become the book’s 3rd edition. It’s interesting to think back on how much of my current work and writing on the topics of helping kids manage anger and teaching them to cope with bullying are tied directly to this work with understanding and changing ‪#‎passiveaggressive‬ behavior. Here’s a light-hearted “test” of how often you use Passive Aggressive Behavior in your daily life:


The Angry Smile Online Training Teaches People How to Manage Passive Aggressive Behavior


The Angry Smile ONLINE course is NOW AVAILABLE via the Life Space Crisis Intervention Institute’s website!  See below for a very special offer…


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Is there a person in your life who procrastinates, carries out tasks in intentionally inefficient ways, is quietly manipulative, creates minor but chronic irritation in others, and makes you feel like you are on an emotional roller coaster? If so, you may be working or living with a PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE person.



REGISTER TODAY FOR THE ANGRY SMILE ONLINE TRAINING to discover how to stop frustrating arguments, endless conflict cycles, and relationship-damaging wars of words.



10% DISCOUNT: All participants who register for The Angry Smile Online course during the month of August 2013 will receive a 10% discount on the course fee! Simply enter the code FACEBOOK at checkout and the discount will be applied upon checkout. 




13 Common Phrases to Let You Know Your Child is Being Passive Aggressive


Does your child express his anger with a passive aggressive vocabulary?  Check out this post from Psychology Today to find out:

4 Strategies for Confronting Passive Aggressive Behavior in Your Relationship


One of my favorite stories about passive aggressive behavior in a marriage goes like this:

“Cash, check or charge?” I asked, after folding the items the woman wished to purchase. As she fumbled for her wallet, I noticed a remote control for a television set in her purse. “So, do you always carry your TV remote?” I asked. “No,” she replied, “but my husband refused to go shopping with me and I figured this was the most evil thing I could do to him legally.”

In relationships, passive aggressive behaviors are often used to avoid the direct confrontation of short-term conflict, but in the long-term, these dynamics can be even more destructive to marriage than outright aggression. To keep assertive communication


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