Posts tagged Rachel Simmons

Spot-On Advice for Young Girls Pondering a “Friend Divorce”

If you’ve ever been in a situation where you need to find the right words to tell a young girl that what she’s about to do is wrong…then check out this column in Teen Vogue, written by Odd Girl Out author, Rachel Simmons.

If you read my blog, you know I’m a big fan of her work and her wisdom–and this is a perfect example of why. I love how Rachel is so honest and forthright in her advice to the girls–while never talking down to them and always maintaining respect for their experiences.

My fingers are crossed that when the time comes, I–and all of my Mom friends–will be able to advise my own daughters this well!

Six Girls Ask: Should We Dump Our Friend?

Rachel Simmons Offers Parents Advice on Cell Phone and Social Media Limits


Rachel Simmons, bestselling author of Odd Girl Out and co-founder of the Girls Leadership Institute (GLI), offers great insights and advice for parents on how to walk the fine line between stalking their children’s technology usage and taking a totally hands-off approach.  Her advice on effective limit-setting–and why limits are so important socially and academically–is great:



Stopping Bullying: Turning Passive Bystanders Into Powerful Allies


I am loving AC360’s special series this week on stopping bullying–especially the exploration of sociologist Robert Faris’ study that focuses on bystanders as change agents.  We can teach kids specific skills for becoming allies before, during, and after incidents of bullying!   This is one of the focus areas in the Friendship & Other Weapons curriculum and the main emphasis in the Mother-Daughter workshop I will be doing for the Girl Scouts of Eastern PA on 10/22.

Check out last night’s AC360 segment: <object width=”416″ height=”374″ classid=”clsid:D27CDB6E-AE6D-11cf-96B8-444553540000″ id=”ep”><param name=”allowfullscreen” value=”true” /><param name=”allowscriptaccess” value=”always” /><param name=”wmode” value=”transparent” /><param name=”movie” value=”” /><param name=”bgcolor” value=”#000000″ />[cnnvideo url=’’ inline=’true’]</object>

Social Combat in Schools: Bullying on Anderson Cooper 360


As part of his ongoing series this week on the subject of bullying, Anderson Cooper talks to sociologist Robert Faris and author Rachel Simmons about the concept of “social combat,” and the culture of victimization in schools. This is a really interesting clip, revealing which kids tend to be most involved in bullying and which ones tend to stay above the fray. Revealing.

Dealing with Rumors, Gossip, and Reputations


Check out this great article by Rachel Simmons, as featured in Teen Vogue:  Simmons shares real life stories of ruined reputations and how girls can cope with social ostracism.

The article is jam-packed with pearls of wisdom, but this quote from one of the gossip-survivors just rings especially true:

Elsa realized that denying the rumors seemed to make them worse, so she decided  to confront them head-on. “The more I was like, ‘It happened. Get over it,’ the  more people would drop it. I think that when you don’t tell people things and  they know it, they become even more invested in figuring out what it is. If  you’re honest and up-front about it, it goes away.”

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‘Odd Girl Out’ tackles bullying in the digital age


‘Odd Girl Out’ tackles bullying in the digital age.

Rachel Simmons did a great interview this morning on the Today Show, talking about girls & cyberbullying.  Always great to hear from her…always frightening to think about the parenting perils ahead of me, raising two daughters.

5 Ways to Talk with Your Daughter About Technology, from Rachel Simmons


In her newly revised and updated  book, Odd Girl Out: The Hidden Culture of Aggression in Girls, author Rachel Simmons suggests five conversation starters for parents to use to get their daughters to open up about social media use.  “Opening lines” and areas ripe for discussion include:

1.  What’s your favorite thing to do online or on your phone?

2. Would your friendships be better or worse without technology? Easier or harder? (more…)

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