Posts tagged parenting advice

Enter to Win a Free Copy of Friendship & Other Weapons


Enter to win a free, signed copy of Friendship & Other Weapons: Group Activities to Help Young Girls Cope With Bullying.  Click here or on the link below to visit Mom Does Reviews for drawing rules and your chance to win.  While you’re there, check out all of the nice things this reviewer had to say about my book 🙂


If you are interested in receiving a review copy of Friendship & Other Weapons or How to Be Angry: An Assertive Anger Expression Group Guide for Kids and Teens, please email me at




Turning Down Your Child’s Invitation to a Power Struggle


In the LSCI Skills for Parents trainings, we teach parents and caregivers skills for preventing power struggles and declining invitations to arguments. I like this honest account from bestselling author, Rosaline Wiseman–both for her showing how easily we all can get drawn into conflict and how the simplest of moves can de-escalate situations effectively. Helps Parents and Kids Cope with Bullying

437–and its predecessor–are terrific resources for kids and teens everywhere! Please check out how they are helping parents and kids cope with bullying.

How to Deal with Bullying in 2012: Radio Interview with Author Trudy Ludwig


Trudy Ludwig is one of my favorite children’s authors and educators on the subject of bullying. Take a listen to her recent interview on coping with bullying in schools.

Referee Much? Why Sibling Rivalry Is Good for Kids


Some days, arguing comes as naturally to my kids as breathing!  I take heart, knowing that there are lessons to be learned.  Please read on and share this link if you, too, spend a lot of your parenthood hoping that all of this bickering will actually benefit your little ones down the line…

Is Your Child a Limit Tester? 3 Essential Steps for Closing Your Loopholes


The morning of School Picture Day, my nine-year old neighbor shocked her mother by picking out her own outfit (a mutual favorite), doing her own hair (bangs pulled back away from the eyes) and even selecting shoes that matched (a bonus, even though the school portrait wouldn’t account for this rarity.) On her way out to the bus, she called to her mom, “Is it okay if I bring a little lip gloss for the picture?”

Sometimes in our parenting lives, we look back on certain moments that seemed so innocent — so perfect even — and realize that ignorance truly is bliss.

When the school portrait proofs were sent home one week later, my Mama-friend could still hear the lip-gloss request in the back of her head, though all she could see in the photo proofs were the brightest (I never knew red could be a neon color) and biggest (I’m talking nose to chin) set of painted lips you have never seen in your entire life.


To read the rest of this story about limit testing, conflict and effective confrontation, please click here or on the link below to read it on its original home, the HuffingtonPost Parents section.

5 Ways to Parent a Perfectionist


Do you have a little one who likes to “do things right…” or else just not do them at all?  Check out my article on for important tips on how to parent a perfectionist:


When I watch my seven-year old daughter agonize over handwriting homework and berate herself for missing one question on her 30-problem math test, I thank the gods of “good enough” that perfectionism was never my thing.  And I ask those same gods for advice on how to help my child overcome her need to be flawless.

If you, too, are the parent of a perfectionist, here are some tips that I have found to be most effective:

1.       Play up personal strengths and play down competitions

In school and at home, my daughter loves to win.  My husband insists that this is a great quality and I know that in many ways, her desire for excellence will serve her well.  Yet I also know that too much of a good thing can be rough, especially for young kids who hold themselves to impossibly high standards.  When my daughter seems singularly focused on being the ‘best” reader in her class or getting the “highest” score in math, we try to re-focus her energies on achieving personal bests and celebrating individual accomplishments instead.  She is visibly calmer and more confident when she attends to her own goals rather than comparing herself to others.

Don’t Carpe Diem: A Great Read on Parenting & the Pressure to Savor Every Moment

This writer hit it out of the park with her article about parenting, savoring moments, and how flippin’ hard it is to savor parenting at every moment!

Scratching Beneath the Surface: Recognizing Common Psychological Defenses Used By Kids

Don’t let the title of my recent post in Psychology Today fool you; little kids are not the only ones who employ psychological defenses to guard against emotional pain.  Tweens, teens, and adults alike often go to great lengths to mask inner pain with defensive words and behaviors.

Parents, teachers, caregivers and friends who recognize common, defensive verbal façades are in the best position to support a child’s true feelings.  Please check out my recent post on to learn how to recognize four of the most common defenses used by kids.

Recognizing & Responding to Your Daughter’s Passive Aggressive Behavior


Amber had been giving her mother the silent treatment all week. She was angry about not being allowed to sleep over at a friend’s house. Late Thursday night, she left a note on her mother’s pillow, asking her mom to wash her uniform before Friday’s soccer game. When Amber returned home from school on Friday, in a rush to pack her gear, she looked all over for her uniform. She finally found it in the washer-perfectly clean, as per her request-but still soaking wet! Amber was late for her game and forced to ride the bench.


When all was un-said and done, Amber’s mother felt defeated. Having one-upped her daughter in the conflict, it was clear to her that she had lost by winning. As parents, most of us have been in situations where traveling the low road is irresistible and we become temporarily reckless in our driving. But anytime we mirror a child’s poor behavior instead of modeling a healthier way to behave, our victories add up to long-term relationship damage and lasting hostilities.


To read the rest of this post and find guidelines for how parents can maintain their calm in a passive aggressive storm and respond in ways that lay the groundwork for less conflictual relationships with their daughters, please visit my blog on Psychology Today.

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