LSCI Certification Training: Aug 5-8, 2019

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It may be snowing outside of my window, but I am looking ahead to summer and happy to announce an LSCI training opportunity in August in eastern Pennsylvania:

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LSCI Certification Training

DATES: August 5-8, 2019

LOCATION: The Swain School, 1100 S. 24th St., Allentown, PA 18103

COSTS: $495/pp before July 15, 2019; $525/pp between July 16-31, 2019

REGISTRATION CLOSES on AUGUST 1, 2019

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Life Space Crisis Intervention is an international training and certification program offering professionals advanced skills for turning problem situations into learning opportunities for young people with self-defeating patterns of behavior.  For full course information, please visit www.lsci.org
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FULL ATTENDANCE THROUGHOUT THE 4 DAY TRAINING IS REQUIRED IN ORDER TO EARN CERTIFICATION
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Participants will experience:
— Instructor-led teaching and modeling of intervention skills
— Real-life video sequences
— Structured and small group activities
— Realistic role-play activities
— Demonstration of skills requirement in order to earn certification
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Learn what to do with young people who:
* Act out in stress, sparking explosive and endless power struggles
* Make poor decisions based on distorted perceptions & thoughts
* Have the right intentions but lack the social skills to be successful
* Are purposefully aggressive with little conscience
* Act in impulsive ways due to feelings of shame and inadequacy
* Become entangled in destructive peer relationships
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Certification in the skills of LSCI does not expire. 
Text:  Long, N., Fecser, F. and Wood, M. (1991).  Life Space Crisis Intervention: Talking with Students in Conflict.  Austin, TX: ProED, Inc.
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If you have any questions prior to registration, please email signewhitson@lsci.org
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To register, click here or cut and paste the link below:

ONLINE REGISTRATION FORM: https://goo.gl/forms/AUkyJdUTJqG2pFrm2

 

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NEW BOOK RELEASE: Parenting the Challenging Child

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The LSCI Institute is extremely excited to announce that after more than three decades of helping professionals work with some of the most challenging children, we now bring our brain-based, trauma-informed, kid-centered approach to the unique needs of parents and caregivers.

Parenting the Challenging Child: The 4-Step Way to Turn Problem Situations Into Learning Opportunities provides readers with:

* Specific skills for building more positive relationships with kids
* Proven strategies for de-escalating stressful situations
* A reliable 4-step framework for turning common problem situations into lasting learning opportunities

This solution-focused book equips readers with new skills to identify and change six problematic patterns of behavior in young people. Even more importantly, readers will learn about how simple changes in the way they interact with loved ones during a problem situation can significantly improve the parent-child relationship and their kids’ future behaviors.

TRAINING AVAILABLE

In addition to the Parenting the Challenging Child textbook (now available for pre-order at a reduced rate), the LSCI Institute will offer both a 2-hour and a full-day training option. Biological parents and caregivers, foster care & adoptive parents, and professionals working in therapeutic foster care and adoption services will all benefit from these live training opportunities offered by certified LSCI Senior Trainers.

Click here to learn more.

PARENTING THE CHALLENGING CHILD: THE 4-STEP WAY TO TURN PROBLEM SITUATIONS INTO LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES IS SCHEDULED TO BE PUBLISHED ON MARCH 1. 2019. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION OR TO ORDER BULK COPIES, PLEASE EMAIL signewhitson@lsci.org today!

Celebrate Kindness Week Activities

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One of the most effective ways to prevent bullying in schools is to build school culture through positive activities focused on Kindness.

 

And soooooooo, we are CELEBRATING KINDNESS this week school-wide!   With spirited, silly dress days, a door decorating contest, and other simple but meaningful activities to help keep kids’ minds on kindness all week long, our goal is to show all students that little acts of kindness can make a big difference for others.

 

Here’s some of the fun we’re having on Day 1, where our CRAZY FOR KINDNESS theme of the day means crazy socks and/or crazy hair!

 

Bullying Prevention Lessons for 5th Grade

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Stopping bullying starts with teaching my 5th grade students how to recognize and differentiate types of bullying. Knowing key behaviors of each type of bullying empowers kids to understand what they are dealing with, so that they can best respond.

#8keystoendbullying

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity instructions and extras can be found here:

 

Teaching Feelings & Empathy in Early Childhood Education

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This week, I’m teaching my Pre-K and Kindergarten students about Feelings and Empathy, using Frosty & his many feeling faces.  There are endless variations to this great core matching activity.

  • I’ve had kids work in partners or groups of three to complete the activity. Some students have asked me if I can leave a copy of the activity in their classroom after my lesson is over because they want to continue playing the Feelings matching game during their Quiet Time.
  • With pre-readers, I omit the feeling word cards and just challenge students to come up with their own original feeling words–which is a great way to build their emotional vocabulary.
  • Students who like a little friendly competition have spontaneously started to time each other in matching up the faces and words correctly.
  • I’ve challenged kids to copy the face on the snowman with their own face, to deepen their experience of the feeling and facial expression.
  • Best of all, I’ve had kids tell each other what could possibly make the snowman feel each individual feeling.  Their imaginative and empathetic responses have been amazing!

 

 

 

School Culture Builders: Inspirational Messages for All

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A positive school culture that leaves no space for bullying is best built through the dozens of “little” things that faculty and staff do on a daily basis to connect with kids and create shared values of kindness, unity and compassion.  On that note, winter Mondays call for Inspiration!

 

Here are some of the messages I printed and shared all around our school today–on mirrors, on doors, inside bathroom stalls, on walls, and anywhere else students and faculty could use some pick-me-up messages and reminders that the most important thing we teach inside of our school walls is how to care for ourselves and others with kindness and dignity.

 

Hope the messages lift you up as well!

 

Principles of Life Space Crisis Intervention (LSCI)

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Experts Share Tips to Stop Bullying in the Classroom

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I love to be included in this roundtable, offered through Study.com, alongside professionals like Michelle Borba and Dorothy Espelage.  Hope some of our tips can be helpful to you as well!

https://study.com/teach/20-experts-on-eradicating-bullying-from-the-classroom.html

Teaching Feelings Literacy and Empathy Skills to Young Students

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When I wrote my first book on the topic of bullying prevention, Friendship & Other Weapons, I wrote it with kids ages 5-12 in mind.  Knowing that bullying peaks in middle school, I wanted to help young kids develop the social emotional skills they need to prevent the dynamics of bullying from taking root in their friendships.

To that end, I am still always developing and teaching new lessons that focus on building fundamental social and emotional intelligence skills, even from the earliest ages.  This month, with my youngest students, I am teaching skills to differentiate feelings and recognize non-verbal emotional cues. This week, “the sorting game” has been a big hit, as kids pick a “feelings face” card from my magic box, then decide if the face looks MAD or SAD. With Kindergarten students, to build empathy skills, I add in a component where the kids are asked to imagine what might be making the person feel mad or sad. They love it!

Dear Teachers…

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